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Wetlands and Stream Mitigation

Page history last edited by Robert Hackett 6 years, 4 months ago

Note: please note that this issue overview should (a) contain links to additional information on this topic that is focused either the local, state, national, or global level, and (b) be neutrally presented, based on facts, and include footnotes for each of the items.  See the Research Guide and Information Sources to assist you. 

 

Goal Statement   one sentence that further defines the topic 


  • Weltand and stream mitigation uses the concept of "no net loss" to preserve the amount of wetlands still in the United States.

 

Policy Options / Model Programs   specific policies or program models, grouped by type, that are profiled 


 

Local/State/National Information    additional information on this topic at the local, state, national, global level


 

Glossary of Terms   key words or phrases that the layperson needs to know to understand this issue 


  • Wetlands: Lands that are transitional between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems wherein the water table is usually at or near the surface and the land is covered periodically by shallow water; those lands must have one or more of the following attributes:[2]

    1. At least periodically, it supports predominantly hydrophytes;
    2. Its substrate is predominantly undrained by hydric soil; and/or
    3. Its substrate is nonsoil and is saturated with water or covered by shallow water at some time during the growing season of each year.
  • Wetland values/wetland functions: Generally understood to encompass:[3]

    1. Environmental quality values (water quality maintenance, aquatic productivity, microclimate regulation, etc.);
    2. Fish and wildlife values (fish and shellfish, waterfowl and other birds, and furbearers and other wildlife); and
    3. Socioeconomic values (flood control, erosion control, water supply, fishing and hunting, aesthetics, research, and education, etc.). Wetlands vary in the values they bestow, depending on local variations in hydrology, soils, vegetation, and topography.
  • Development: Human activity that impacts or disturbs wetlands.[4]

    Mitigation: Compensation for unavoidable alteration that counterbalances the damage or destruction of the natural wetland ecosystem (including habitat and hydrology).[5]

    Restoration: Rehabilitation of a natural wetland ecosystem after disturbance by human activity. [6]

  • No Net Loss: During the devolopment of an area, all wetlands and streams that are impacted must be compensated so that the total function ad acreage of wetlands and streams remains the same. 

 

Bibliography    


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Footnotes

  1. Sierra Club website, http://www.sierraclub.org/policy/conservation/wetlands.aspx , glossary section, retrieved on 2/18/10. ▲
  2. Sierra Club website, http://www.sierraclub.org/policy/conservation/wetlands.aspx , glossary section, retrieved on 2/18/10.
  3. Sierra Club website, http://www.sierraclub.org/policy/conservation/wetlands.aspx , glossary section, retrieved on 2/18/10.
  4. Sierra Club website, http://www.sierraclub.org/policy/conservation/wetlands.aspx , glossary section, retrieved on 2/18/10.
  5. Sierra Club website, http://www.sierraclub.org/policy/conservation/wetlands.aspx , glossary section, retrieved on 2/18/10.
  6. Sierra Club website, http://www.sierraclub.org/policy/conservation/wetlands.aspx , glossary section, retrieved on 2/18/10.

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